28Aug

Some business-building tasks are more challenging than others, and naming your health coaching business is definitely one that falls into that category. That’s because 1) it defines you and your business, 2) it’s something that’s really important to you, and 3) you probably think it has to be perfect.

Yes, your business name should reflect what makes you unique. And yes, it will affect everything from your domain name and email address to your logo and marketing materials. But here’s one thing it doesn’t have to do: bring on a mild panic attack every time you sit down to work on it.

In today’s post, we’ll be sharing tips on how to name your health coaching business. Then we’ll go into specific examples of what makes a good name good and what makes a not-so-good name, well, not-so-good. But first…

Get Out of Your Own Head

Forget the notion that all of your name ideas have to be awesome right out of the gate. Overthinking and self-editing are the quickest ways to stifle your creativity. Don’t stress about it, either. So many people put off launching their health coaching businesses because they don’t have a name yet, and while you shouldn’t just pick one randomly out of the air, you shouldn’t let this business-building task hold you back.

Stay Inspired

When I was coming up with a name for my health coaching business, I used every resource I could get my hands on, like this Primal Health Coach Institute post with catchy names—and this follow-up post with more catchy names. These posts include actual names of health coaching businesses, so they’re not available, but they do get the juices flowing as you contemplate what you’re going to name your business.

I also used Facebook for inspiration. If you’re in a Facebook group with other health coaches, ask them to share their websites. This is great way to see what your peers are naming their businesses. Plus, it lets you see how they structured things like their home page, services, and pricing. The more information you have to pull from, the more inspired you’ll be.

Reach Out to Your Network

Don’t be afraid to shop name ideas around to your network, especially those who are primally-minded, and get their feedback. If you’ve just been getting your feet wet with health coaching, perhaps starting with a few friends or family as clients, consider reaching out to them to ask what their favorites are on your shortlist and why, or even sending out a short survey of names to a select few. The community is everywhere, from forums, Facebook groups, and microblogging sites to active comments sections on popular blogs.

6 Things to Consider When Coming Up With a Name

  1. Your niche audience. Maybe you help truck drivers eat healthy on the road, work with moms-to-be managing gestational diabetes, or coach over-exercisers learning to incorporate meditation. Whatever your niche is, having a name that says something about them or the challenges they face can be really impactful.
  2. It should feel like you. Do you want your name to be conversational? Fun? Serious? Straightforward? There’s no right or wrong answer here, but the name you choose should reflect the vibe you’re trying to give off.
  3. It should be easy to remember. Keep it short and sweet if possible, and make sure it’s easy to pronounce and easy to spell.
  4. Making sure it’s not too similar. Do a quick Google search to see if anyone’s using a name similar to the one you’re thinking about. This isn’t a complete deal breaker, but if it’s too close you may want to reconsider—you don’t want your clients accidentally ending up at the wrong website or address.
  5. Use your own name. Struggling to come up with something that doesn’t feel cheesy or contrived? Using your name as part of your business name is a great idea. It gives you flexibility if your niche audience evolves, plus it’s your name, so there’s a good chance no one else will be using it.
  6. Domain name availability. Once you have a few names you like, see if the URL is available. If the exact one you have your eye on isn’t up for grabs, you still have a few options. Is the .com taken? Try .net or .co. Or modify the URL to describe your name (i.e. instead of Jenn’s Primal Life, try JennLivesPrimally.com).

This is the process I used when I came up with my health coaching business name. I took advantage of all the resources above, then just started writing. I thought about the types of clients I wanted to help, what their struggles are, what my own struggles were when I started my health journey, and the vibe I wanted to give off. I wanted the name to be approachable, impactful, and let people know what I stood for right off the bat. And of course, I wanted it to be memorable and available. At one point I had about 20 names, then started crossing off the ones that didn’t feel right. Eventually I landed on the name Running On Real Fuel, and instantly knew it was the right one for me.

So, What Makes a Good Name Good?

Now you have the tools to come up with a name for your health coaching business, but what makes it good? And how do you know if it’s not good? Check out these examples below.

Say you’re a food-centric health coach that helps people find balance in their diets.

Here’s an example of a good name: 80/20 Nutrition

  • Why it’s good: Easy to remember, easy to spell, and gives a sense of the company’s principles. For your URL, you might consider spelling the numbers out or using a dash, i.e. 80-20nutrition.com

Now here’s the bad version of this name: The Way to Better Balance Your Diet

  • Why it’s bad: It doesn’t have personality, it sounds more like a title than a name, and it’s way too long. Can you imagine having to type that URL?

How about a fitness-based health coach that caters to Crossfitters with Primal lifestyles?

Here’s an example of a good name: CrossFit Ninjas

  • Why it’s good: It’s short, fun, niche-centric, and memorable. (There is a group in the Netherlands that uses this name, however. Remember to always do a search for same or similar names before you get attached to one.)

Now here’s the bad version of this name: Kipping it Real

  • Why it’s bad: Sometimes a pun works, but in this case it could be hit or miss depending on who you’re targeting. If your niche audience is serious about fitness and nutrition, a silly name probably won’t cut it.

What about health coaches who want to integrate their own name?

Here’s an example of a good name: Mark’s Daily Apple

  • Why it’s good: It feels personal, it’s clever, and there aren’t a million business names just like it.

Now here’s the bad version of this name: Mark’s High Healthxpectations

  • Why it’s bad: Made up words can be hard to pronounce, and usually get less traction when it comes to SEO.

Don’t Forget to Look Into the Legal Stuff

If you’ve found a name you love, congratulations! But before you buy the domain name, design the logo, and set up shop online, there’s one more thing you should do: make sure no one else is using it.

Your state’s Department of Revenue is a good place to start. If the name you’re thinking about is available, you’ll want to register it. That prevents other businesses in your state from using it. But just like health coaching laws, each state has its own rules on how things work, so don’t assume that other health coaching businesses can’t have a similar name to yours.

You might also want to trademark your name. The United States Patent and Trademark Office lets you check to see if the name you chose is being used by another company (in the health coaching world or otherwise) anywhere in the U.S. If it’s available, you can trademark it for a small fee. This keeps your business name protected so that no one else can legally use it.

Conclusion

Naming your health coaching business can drive you crazy, but it doesn’t have to. If you’ve been waiting to launch your practice because you don’t have a name, stop what you’re doing right now and follow these tips:

  • Get out of your own head and stop overthinking it
  • Check out blogs and Facebook groups to get inspired
  • Consider your niche audience
  • Remember what makes a good name good
  • Register your name at the state and/or federal level so it’s legally yours

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